Outback RV Owners Forum: Is 30A 220V - Outback RV Owners Forum

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Is 30A 220V

#1 User is offline   Stance 

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:32 PM

Is the 30A shore power 220V or 110V? I have 220V (40A) in my garage for my welder. I'll make an adapter if it is 220V. Thanks.
Joe

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#2 User is offline   Gr8daggett 

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:34 PM

View PostStance, on 14 November 2011 - 07:32 PM, said:

Is the 30A shore power 220V or 110V? I have 220V (40A) in my garage for my welder. I'll make an adapter if it is 220V. Thanks.


The 30 amps is 110/120 Vac :2thumbsup:
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#3 User is offline   Insomniak 

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:35 PM

It's 110 volt. DON'T plug it into a 220 volt outlet!!!
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#4 User is offline   hautevue 

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:02 PM

BTW: the 50a socket in campgrounds is also 120v ac, NOT 220!! So whether you have a 30a or 50a connector on your TT, both are 120v.
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#5 User is offline   KTMRacer 

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:31 PM

View Posthautevue, on 14 November 2011 - 06:02 PM, said:

BTW: the 50a socket in campgrounds is also 120v ac, NOT 220!! So whether you have a 30a or 50a connector on your TT, both are 120v.



well, not quite. the 50A is two adjacent 50A 120V legs in a circuit. two circuits, 120V to ground 180 degrees out of phase. 240 across the hot legs. Inside the trailer it is two 50A 120V legs. So, yes, only 120V is available in the trailer but if you measure at the pedestal or at the panel across the two hot legs you'll get 240V.

here is more info. note that a 30A circuit is good for 3600watts, the 50A is good for 12,000 watts.


The 50-amp 120/240-volt 3 pole 4 wire grounding Service


This 50-amp service has 4 wires with two 120-volt HOT feeds. It is a misconception that this 50-amp RV service is something special. This service is a STANDARD 120/240 50-amp 3 pole with 4 prongs used for numerous applications.

From this common service we can draw 120 or 240 volts. Each leg is 50 amps @ 120 volts. 50-amp X 120-volt = 6000 watts. But since there are 2 HOT 120-volt legs at 6000 + 6000 = 12,000 watts to use in the RV or 50-amp X 240-volt = 12,000 watts when used as a 240-volt service.
Almost ALL 50-amp wired RV's use both sides of the service separately as 120 volt on each leg. Only a few mostly high-end coaches utilize the 240-volt from this same service.

The 50-amp 3-pole 4-wire service is superior to the 30-amp service because of the total amperage available.

30-amp 120-volt service = 3,600 watts
50-amp 120/240-volt service = 12,000 watts

If you ever come across a 30A RV receptacle not at an RV hookup, (like in a house), check it first to make sure it is 120V. These are sometimes miswired as a 220V 30A service.
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#6 User is offline   CamperAndy 

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:33 AM

View PostKTMRacer, on 14 November 2011 - 06:31 PM, said:

View Posthautevue, on 14 November 2011 - 06:02 PM, said:

BTW: the 50a socket in campgrounds is also 120v ac, NOT 220!! So whether you have a 30a or 50a connector on your TT, both are 120v.


well, not quite. .........


Well said KTMRacer - X2
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#7 User is offline   Grover 

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 10:24 AM

This thread goes a long way towards proving if you don't know what you are doing with electricity, you can be in big trouble. It is best left to someone who knows what to do. Have them show you what needs to be done while they are doing it for you. Electricity is like a snake, it can kill you before you can move away. You cannot outrun electricity!!

#8 User is offline   Stance 

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 12:40 PM

Thanks all. I couldn't understand why the adapter to go from the shore power cord to a regular 110V wall plug as so small and simple. Now I know.

I know enough about electricity to get me into trouble. :) I always make sure I know what I'm doing before messing with it. If it's beyond changing switches, outlets, etc., I let my electrician nephew do it.
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#9 User is offline   hautevue 

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 01:27 PM

I agree w/KTMRacer's cogent explanation. The 50a socket does have 220 across the two hot legs, but no "normal" TT/RV uses 220, except, as he notes, the very high end units, probably that big diesel pusher motor home.

But for we TT folks, the 50 amp and 30 amp power cords we have are expecting 120v on their hot lines.

He also makes a very good point to be aware that sometimes folks put a 30a RV socket in the garage, and wire it with 220. Plugging your TT shore power into that voltage will toast your TT circuits. If you run across an RV socket in that situation, just check it out first with your handy dandy voltmeter.

Thanks KTMRacer for the info. Well said.
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#10 User is offline   Wisconsin-Knight 

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 12:26 PM

I want to compliment KTMRacer for pointing out the potential to plug a 30 amp plug into a 240 volt outlet in a residential situation. I hadn't thought of that. I would also like to point out that while 12000 watts are available when using a 240 volt 50 amp circuit, since only 120 volts are commonly used, only 6000 watts are available to a travel trailer with a 50 amp cord. So the advantage of 50 amps is not great unless using 240 volts. My post of adding a 20 amp extension cord to run the hot water heater gets you access to the same wattage since 30 plus 20 amps equals 50 amps.

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#11 User is offline   CamperAndy 

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 01:25 PM

View PostWisconsin-Knight, on 17 November 2011 - 09:26 AM, said:

I want to compliment KTMRacer for pointing out the potential to plug a 30 amp plug into a 240 volt outlet in a residential situation. I hadn't thought of that. I would also like to point out that while 12000 watts are available when using a 240 volt 50 amp circuit, since only 120 volts are commonly used, only 6000 watts are available to a travel trailer with a 50 amp cord. So the advantage of 50 amps is not great unless using 240 volts. My post of adding a 20 amp extension cord to run the hot water heater gets you access to the same wattage since 30 plus 20 amps equals 50 amps.

Rowland


Actually a 50 amp RV cord provides two 50 amp circuits at 120 volts or one 50 amp circuit at 240 volts. The sum is the same 12,000 watts.
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#12 User is offline   Wisconsin-Knight 

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 01:10 AM

View PostCamperAndy, on 17 November 2011 - 12:25 PM, said:

View PostWisconsin-Knight, on 17 November 2011 - 09:26 AM, said:

I want to compliment KTMRacer for pointing out the potential to plug a 30 amp plug into a 240 volt outlet in a residential situation. I hadn't thought of that. I would also like to point out that while 12000 watts are available when using a 240 volt 50 amp circuit, since only 120 volts are commonly used, only 6000 watts are available to a travel trailer with a 50 amp cord. So the advantage of 50 amps is not great unless using 240 volts. My post of adding a 20 amp extension cord to run the hot water heater gets you access to the same wattage since 30 plus 20 amps equals 50 amps.

Rowland


Actually a 50 amp RV cord provides two 50 amp circuits at 120 volts or one 50 amp circuit at 240 volts. The sum is the same 12,000 watts.


Camper Andy, thanks for the correction, I obviously didn't know that! On that basis, people wanting to add another AC unit because of global warming we are experiencing should really consider changing to a 50 amp cord and distribution center. My extra extension cord is small potatoes compared to adding an additional 6000 watts!

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#13 User is offline   Lmbevard 

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:42 PM

As far as plugging into the 220V welder plug in your garage, You can have an adapter made that would only use one leg of the 220 to provide 40A 110V to the camper. I ended up having to use a 50A RV to 30A RV adapter since the 30A breaker was too weak. If you don't know what you're doing, an electrician could put something together easily. If you're doing it yourself, use at least 8 gauge wire to handle the load.
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#14 User is offline   Stance 

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 07:30 PM

Yeah, I thought about doing that. The 110V plug I use can handle the A/C and fridge all day. When I add in something like the electric water heater, then it craps out. So, it won't be often that I need more amperage. I'll probably just wait until I get to that point.
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#15 User is offline   cdn campers 

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 10:40 AM

Posted Imagecan you plug a 30 amp male plug into a 50 amp female. and as long as you dont over amp you wold be okay. ???
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