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Do I Have Enough Truck?

F-150 Ecoboost 250RS

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#1 jfmasson

jfmasson

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 07:40 PM

Good day to all,

 

I guess I just need some assurance from Outbackers similar to me.

 

I have a 2011 10th edition Outback 250RS since last fall.  Have not used it yet.

 

I recently changed my truck and got a 2016 F-150 3.5l Ecoboost with Max Tow, payload capacity of 1767 lbs, LT tires with load range E.

 

I will be adding 5000 lbs lift bags in back to help the springs and I also have a weight distribution system and anti-sway bar 

 

Gross weight of the TT is 7490 lbs roughly.

 

I travel with my GF and 2 kids.  We are very reasonnable on hauling gear and never go above 90 km/h (55 mph)

 

I crunched all the numbers and I appear on the safe side everywhere (GVWR, GCVWR, etc.)

 

Still some say pulling 7500 lbs with a 1/2 ton pick-up is pretty much on the upper limit and crosswinds will give you cold sweats.

 

Should I be very concerned with my set-up?

 

Please advise



#2 thefulminator

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:05 AM

I have a similar setup with a 2009 Silverado 1500 with a 9500 lb tow rating and a 2013 250RS which has the same gross and tongue weight as your 2011.  I've never had an issue towing anywhere although I do go rather slow over mountain passes.  As far as the gross weight of the trailer, since you have the max tow package I doubt you will have any issues with the truck's towing capacity. 

The issue you will have it weight on the rear axle of the truck.  I never am less than 500 lbs overweight on the rear axle.  My truck's payload is similar to yours in the 1700 lb range.  That 1700 lbs includes the weight of the passengers, fuel, bed liner, cap or tonneau cover, the stuff in the bed, weight of the weight distribution hitch, the tongue weight of the trailer and anything else you have in the truck.  The majority of that weigh is more towards the rear axle than the front so the rear axle takes most of it. 

I don't know how old your kids are or the physical size of your family but if you subtract 600 lbs for passengers, 160 lbs for gas (6.3 lbs per gallon, 25 gallons) the 640 lbs tongue weight of your trailer, in my case the hitch itself, 102 lbs for my Equalizer,  leaves about 200+ lbs for everything else.  I'm not saying this will be a problem.  It never has been for me.  I just think you should be aware of it ahead of time. 

I also have airbags which make a big difference in the amount that the back of the truck sags and reduces porposing but they don't add any capacity to the rear axle. What was originally on the axle is still on the axle but will have more cushion.

I would recommend that you hook up the trailer to the truck without anything else loaded and find a truck scale to weigh each axle separately.  After that load everything up that you need for camping and weigh it all again.  At least you will know how much weight you are over on the axle and what is causing it.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk

2009 Silverado LT 1500 4X4 Crew Cab, 9500 lb towing capacity with Putnam XDR and Equalizer 10K, + 2013 Outback 250RS, Moonlight
Me ('65), DW ('68), DS1 ('99), DS2 ('03), Dwoof ('12)


We all bleed Orange and Black, GO BEAVS
gallery_6092_1466_7959.jpggallery_653_832_11751.jpg


#3 jfmasson

jfmasson

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 01:07 PM

I have a similar setup with a 2009 Silverado 1500 with a 9500 lb tow rating and a 2013 250RS which has the same gross and tongue weight as your 2011.  I've never had an issue towing anywhere although I do go rather slow over mountain passes.  As far as the gross weight of the trailer, since you have the max tow package I doubt you will have any issues with the truck's towing capacity. 

The issue you will have it weight on the rear axle of the truck.  I never am less than 500 lbs overweight on the rear axle.  My truck's payload is similar to yours in the 1700 lb range.  That 1700 lbs includes the weight of the passengers, fuel, bed liner, cap or tonneau cover, the stuff in the bed, weight of the weight distribution hitch, the tongue weight of the trailer and anything else you have in the truck.  The majority of that weigh is more towards the rear axle than the front so the rear axle takes most of it. 

I don't know how old your kids are or the physical size of your family but if you subtract 600 lbs for passengers, 160 lbs for gas (6.3 lbs per gallon, 25 gallons) the 640 lbs tongue weight of your trailer, in my case the hitch itself, 102 lbs for my Equalizer,  leaves about 200+ lbs for everything else.  I'm not saying this will be a problem.  It never has been for me.  I just think you should be aware of it ahead of time. 

I also have airbags which make a big difference in the amount that the back of the truck sags and reduces porposing but they don't add any capacity to the rear axle. What was originally on the axle is still on the axle but will have more cushion.

I would recommend that you hook up the trailer to the truck without anything else loaded and find a truck scale to weigh each axle separately.  After that load everything up that you need for camping and weigh it all again.  At least you will know how much weight you are over on the axle and what is causing it.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk

Thx Fulminator

 

I checked those payload numbers before, I am kinda just at the limit on paper.  

That is why I am limiting useless gear.

 

I believe the 640 lbs tongue weight for the trailer is based on an unloaded trailer (no propane, batteries, fresh water, beer, etc...)  I always use 850 lbs as hitch weight (11% of GVWR).

 

As I said, everything seems to have a "green light", I was just wondering if there was something I had forgotten

 

I appreciate the comments

 

Regards  



#4 thefulminator

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  • Location:Lynnwood, WA
  • Outback/SOB:2013 Outback 250RS, Moonlight
  • Tow Vehicle:2009 Silverado LT 1500 4x4 Crew Cab

Posted 16 May 2019 - 01:20 PM

Because of the weight limitations of our truck we have been loading some of our gear in totes and hauling them on the floor under the rear bed. Since the load is aft of the trailer wheels it takes weight of the tongue which reduces the load on the rear truck axle.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk

2009 Silverado LT 1500 4X4 Crew Cab, 9500 lb towing capacity with Putnam XDR and Equalizer 10K, + 2013 Outback 250RS, Moonlight
Me ('65), DW ('68), DS1 ('99), DS2 ('03), Dwoof ('12)


We all bleed Orange and Black, GO BEAVS
gallery_6092_1466_7959.jpggallery_653_832_11751.jpg


#5 jfmasson

jfmasson

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 06:24 PM

Because of the weight limitations of our truck we have been loading some of our gear in totes and hauling them on the floor under the rear bed. Since the load is aft of the trailer wheels it takes weight of the tongue which reduces the load on the rear truck axle.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk

 

Won't loading behind the trailer wheels create more risk of sway?



#6 thefulminator

thefulminator

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  • Outback/SOB:2013 Outback 250RS, Moonlight
  • Tow Vehicle:2009 Silverado LT 1500 4x4 Crew Cab

Posted 16 May 2019 - 11:36 PM

 

Because of the weight limitations of our truck we have been loading some of our gear in totes and hauling them on the floor under the rear bed. Since the load is aft of the trailer wheels it takes weight of the tongue which reduces the load on the rear truck axle.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk

 

Won't loading behind the trailer wheels create more risk of sway?

 

 

Perhaps, but I am only talking about a couple hundred pounds at most.  It is a small fraction of the total weight of the trailer but a significant fraction of what I put in the back of the truck.  I have the longest wheel base I could get in a chevy half ton which helps.  Also, I upgraded my receiver from the overly flexible receiver that came stock on the truck to a class V Putnam.  With that, the air bags and a properly adjusted Equalizer hitch I've never had problems.  Sway is a function of motion and harmonics.  I have dampened not only side to side motion with the hitch but also the up and down motion with the receiver and air bags as much as possible.  I've never experienced sway with my setup.


2009 Silverado LT 1500 4X4 Crew Cab, 9500 lb towing capacity with Putnam XDR and Equalizer 10K, + 2013 Outback 250RS, Moonlight
Me ('65), DW ('68), DS1 ('99), DS2 ('03), Dwoof ('12)


We all bleed Orange and Black, GO BEAVS
gallery_6092_1466_7959.jpggallery_653_832_11751.jpg


#7 RickyandSamantha

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 11:45 AM

We have a 2018 250urs and a 2015 F-150 3.5l ecoboost with max tow 2wd. it does have some sway but nothing that would be of concern to me. we stay under 65mph and the truck has plenty of power and control. with everything loaded i'm sure we are close to overweight on the rear axle but we never hit the bump stops and i have no suspension upgrades.  Take it Easy the first few trips until you learn how it handles and you'll be fine. 



#8 vinny

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Posted 31 August 2020 - 01:04 PM

Still using what was my first TT a 298RE with a 770 Lb. tong weight Like you I had doubts  although I was within capacity according to the owners manual and GM help desk. After several trips I decided I needed a bigger vehicle. Sway was always a problem passing trucks and wind kept me on my toes and the wife grasping the door handle's. On the road the transmission stay pretty cool but in stop/go situations it would creep up clos to 200 degrees F. The other thing no one seems to mention is stopping an 8000lb trailer. 

I had to make a quick stop at a traffic light and wound up in the middle of an intersection. It was raining the light went to yellow and I found myself asking should I stop or continue?  I elected to stop the trailer pushed the truck the wheel just slipped on the wet pavement not enough weight on them.
 what I learned from this is yes the truck will tow the weight BUT.  On the Tahoe the wheel base was too short suspension too soft and brakes too small.
 I moved up to a 2500HD double cab and towing and stopping are much easier . Also consider I was driving on flat Florida roads get into hills and stopping can be a real concern. I think it was on this forum someone suggested calculating your loading and then do no not exceed 70% of the capacity of the tow vehicle and you and the truck will be better off.





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