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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After removing the stock battery I am upgrading with two group 24 AGM batteries from Interstate Battery.
The advice needed is after 3-4 days of dry camping is it OK to hook up to the truck and drive off or do you think it might be too fast of a charge back to these batteries? Is there a common formula for figuring this one out?

Thanks,

Scott
 

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Scott, I'm not an expert, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night
Most of all Welcome to the Outbackers! What type of Outback do you have?

Ok now on to your question... Reality is that the small gage wire that runs back to feed the batteries isn't much more than a trickle charge at best. So you should be just fine. Considering that most RVers do this all the time it should give you even more assurance that it won't hurt your batteries.

On my PopUp the dealer ran a heavy gage wire back since the PopUp fridge runs of 12v and the heavy wire helped to assure the drain was off the truck and not off the battery while towing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We bought an '03 21RS last Saturday, our return to modern camping! We had a '78 18 foot Nomad that we sold about 12 years ago and have been using a 14 foot Wells Cargo Cycle Hauler for just about everything including camping. Last October we were camping in the Gifford Pinchot NF at about 3,000 feet. We woke up to 39 degrees in the trailer and that was our inspiration to look for something a bit more "comfy". We found it after much looking and internet research.

I did the dual battery mod last night and even put in a disconnect so I can isolate both batteries if I need too. The batteries I bought are group 24's with 750 CCA and weigh maybe 15 pounds each more than the one the trailer came with. The stock battery was 405 CCA by the way. I should be able to dry camp for a few days longer with this setup.

I am going to work on quieting down the water pump this weekend. Sounds like a couple of cats fighting in there.......

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Kevin, and I did look at the Battery discussion before. That is where I found out about the disconnect. I think these batts weigh in at 56 lbs. each and are a handfull to get in that tight spot on the tongue.

Thanks to all for all of the great resources provided here, ain't the internet a great thing?!

Scott
 

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I think I know the answer, but want to be sure! If I install a battery disconnect switch between the neg pole and the negative wire, can I still plug in the shore power and power the TT with the battery disconnected?

I just want to make sure that there is no requirement to have a load (battery) connected to the converter when you plug in the shore power.
 

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Mac I'm 99% sure you need to have the battery connected to use the shore power since the 12v system needs the circut to function. The disconnect switch is a simple flip switch so you can easly engage it when you need shower power, then remove the plug and flip disconnect.
 

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Y,

Does that mean that you will always be charging your batteries while connected to shore power?

I thought that I read somewhere, when connected to power you want to disconnect your batteries so you don't boil them dry. So what would be the reason to have a battery switch then? I am confused.

I will try mine tomorrow before I head out for the weekend and see if the system operates without a battery, curiosity has got me now.

Thanks for the info, I will see what happens.

Kevin
 

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Kevin, I don't leave my shore power connected. Anytime you are connected to shore power you are getting a trickle charge, in a few weeks it won't boil batteries dry, but long term it can. Since a trickle charge doesn't really condition a battery very well I don't rely on it for battery eminence.

My routine is that when I return home, I check the battery fluid level, charge them with the deep cycle charger. If need power I'll connect the shower power once the battery is done, then disconnect shore power and disconnect the battery. Before I leave on a trip I then reconnect the battery, quick deep cycle charge and then connect shore power for fridge cooling. I bought a battery disconnect switch to make it easier, but my goal is to keep my batteries for a long time and to make sure they are able to hold the largest amount of a charge as possible.
 

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I've installed 2 Trojan T-105 6V batteries in series (-ive on battery 1 to +ive on battery 2). I also put a marine battery disconnect between -ive on battery 2 and the -ive connection on trailer. The disconnect comes with a red key that can easily be removed. Once the batteries test full charge via driving or converter (trailer plugged in), I disconnect the batteries with the switch so they won't be overcharged. The setup works great and gives me a lot of battery power and control over when I want the batteries trickle charged.
 

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One other point. You don't need the battery connected for all systems to work. I have the disconnect off when hooked to power and not charging batteries.
 

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Martybeech,

I have the same setup as you only a little older. I have only had my truck about two week and can't wait to tow with it!

jdhankins
 
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