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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, we've got one of those inexpensive, noisy coleman generators.. Hoping to convince the husband to invest in a Honda, but he's not into spending the money right now.
Anyway, we're going to the beach and will need to charge the batteries. In the past, we have just hooked up the trailer power cord to the genset, but it seems to charge pretty slow (and like I said, that genset is a bit noisy). Would it charge faster if we just hooked it up to one of the batteries through a separate battery charger?
And how is that done? We used to have two 6-volt on our old trailer so we could hook them up together, but I don't think we can do that with the 2 12-volts.
SO, do we hook up just one battery to the battery charger/generator and charge away? (without disconnecting anything?)
 

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I've read that the batteries will charge much quicker, if connected directly to the generator. I recall my Outback dealer explaining that the converter in the trailer is not much more than a trickle charger and will take considerable time to charge the batteries. I'm not sure how your generator is set up, but ours has both 120v and 12v outputs. I'm guessing you'd have to charge each battery indepently, unless you made up (or bought) some kind of specialy cable that could hook up to the batteries in parrallel.

I never bought the optional cable for ours to directly connect the 12v source.
The Honda generator we use throttles down to meet demand, so I just plug the trailer power cord in and let it charge the batteries through the trailer's converter. We use a lot of battery power and usually charge them for four hours per day, when dry camping. This may not be practical using a generator without the throttle feature, it would take a lot of gas. Ours runs 12 to 16 hours on a gallon of gas, if only used to charge battteries. Of course with the A/C, microwave, wife's hair dryer, toater, coffee pot, etc. we use it quite a bit. Is that dry camping?

Anyway, to make a long story longer, I'm really happy with the Honda and the automatic throttle avoids the trouble of hooking up to the batteries to charge. The 2000 watt is probably the minimum size required if you want it run the A/C or microwave, but a smaller one would be fine for charging. Anything larger than a 2000 is probably not practical for one person to carry around.

Oh, by the way, we paid $879 for ours last year from northwestpowertools.com and it included free UPS shipping. Not sure about current pricing.

Good luck
 

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Yes, the A/C runs with the 2000, but that's all it can handle. If you turn on any other 120v pull, it will kick out. I leave the converter on when running the A/C, but the generator did kick out one time doing this. I think it depends if compressor in the A/C tries to start against pressure or not.
 

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We have a Honda 3000 at work, and it is pretty big. The 2000 looks much smaller, and easier to drag around.
 
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