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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be in Oregon longer than I expected...February now...so I'm facing winter issues that I hadn't been anticipating. I put in a heated insulated water connection. I only have the 2 standard LP tanks so I prefer to minimize use of the furnace and am generally pretty comfortable just using a ceramic space heater. The basement is enclosed and insulated, but without the furnace running it isn't getting heated. At what point do I need to worry about lines freezing? We had a power outage last week with that little ice storm and I was on tenterhooks worrying about burst lines (I don't have a generator). I'm considering renting a larger LP tank and getting delivery service, I was liking going the cheapo route though.

Also I was doing routine stuff last night, changing the sheets and flipping the mattress and I freaked out when I found the underside of the mattress at the head of the bed was wet. I couldn't feel any moisture under the platform or on the carpeting. The queen bed is at the front hitch end of the 5th wheel. I flipped it and left it to air out, but it wasn't until today about 12hrs later that I thought to remove the headboard to check behind there. Headboard is a really heavy duty deal, 3/4 inch plywood inch, upholstered, and inch and a half wood trim around the edges...I don't see any signs that the headboard has been exposed to any leaks, and it seems like that would show pretty obviously on plywood. The plywood platform the mattress sits on is covered with linoleum (literally, on the underside is a white diamond pattern) and it felt cold and a little damp at the top of the bed. Could that much moisture accumulate just from condensation?? What do I do to fix it? I'm completely grossed out thinking what my mattress is going to grow if this continues. You guys have been awesome helping me learn my way along...thanks!
 

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Where are you in Oregon? That will make a big difference in temperatures.

If the weather is below freezing just overnight...then keep cabinet doors open will be enough. If they are under freezing for a few days, you should probably do some winterizing. Blowing out the lines (including outside sink and black tank flush are important. Keep hot water tank ON...so that won't freeze.

Regarding the moisture...yes, it comes from you breathing in the RV and wet stuff you bring in (coat...hat...shoes...dog...etc...)

Adding 3-4 of these throughout you RV will REALLY help. You can also run the AC to remove moisture...just don't turn it to cool...:)

http://www.drizair.com/

Watch this video for more info.


Another trick I've heard it to buy a few cookie sheets from say the Dollar Store....drill some holes in the sides (yea...they are not that big...but you can do it). Then push your bed up against the cookie sheets to allow airflow.

Renting a larger propane tank might be a good idea...based on where you are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm just outside of Portland and it's not Buffalo-cold, but it's getting cold enough that I'm worrying about it.

I searched 'rv bed condensation' and was shocked to read how easily this happens, I thought for sure I had a leak until I inspected further by light of day. I'll try to rig something up to get better airflow under the mattress. It's clear to me now that that the completely unprotected part of the trailer that overhangs the truck bed and has no basement compartment to insulate it is where the moisture accumulated. Makes sense to me now. Glad I found this fairly early on 😨 Thanks for the help Oregon camper
 

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Take caution over the next 3-4 days....we are not going to get above freezing, so your water lines could possibly freeze.

An inexpensive air compressor (@ ~40 PSI) can have you winterized in about 5 mins.
 

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My advice. head over to freddy's, lowes, home depot and get a small REAL dehumidifier. one that has a compressor. between your breathing, oregon air, any use of the stove that produces water, it's easy to get the humidity way to high in a trailer. Best $100 you'll ever spend. The first day you may need to empty it twice, maybe three times, then down to once each day.
 

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My advice. head over to freddy's, lowes, home depot and get a small REAL dehumidifier. one that has a compressor. between your breathing, oregon air, any use of the stove that produces water, it's easy to get the humidity way to high in a trailer. Best $100 you'll ever spend. The first day you may need to empty it twice, maybe three times, then down to once each day.
This. And the air that comes out will be dry and Warm. So it helps with the heat bill
 
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