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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody ever installed scissor jacks (one one each side mounted to the frame behind the wheels) that are used to level (not just stabalize) in place of ramps or 2x6's. They are not that expensive and seem like a good alternative to having to carry all that stuff around to level the TT?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand that the jacks that come with the TT are for stabalizing only, but I think that you can purchase aftermarket jacks that are designed to level too. Am I wrong??
 

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I can't think of why you couldn't use them, but before I installed them, I would get confirmation from Keystone. I would think that the frame would be the most stable, and strongest place to use to level the unit.

If you find anything out, let me know. I was thinking about the same upgrade to my 26RS a few years down the road.

Tim
 

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I remember reading in the manual somewhere the trailer frame as well as body isn't designed to be jacked up or leveled from the corners. By jacking from the corners, excess stress can be put on the frame and possibly twist the frame and cause damage to the body of the trailer. The trailer should be leveled using blocking under the wheels and then stabilized with jacks at the corners.

Mike
 

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Yeh Mike I think that's what I remember reading as well. On the other hand the scissor jacks do work better for stabilizing the TT. Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I read that too. It makes sense to me that if you put them out at the corners, that it could put stress on the frame.

My thought was to put one just behind the wheels on each side, attached to the frame. Since the axle is attached to the frame, it doesn't seem to me that there would be all that much difference. When I pulled into the site, I would only use the one on the low side to level the TT side-to-side. Since most of the "leveling jacks" are advertised rated to around 6000lbs, it should be no problem supporting the weight. I would then use the existing "stabalizing jacks" already on the TT to stabalize.

I would appreciate the continued input from the community here.
 

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We picked up two of the BAL Deluxe Wheel Chocks, which go between the tires then spread out to lock the wheels. We found they did help to stabalize the trailer as well, and of course they also provided necessary chocks. I don't think I'd feel comforable jacking the frame up, and using the Lynx levelers only takes me a couple of minutes and they are much lighter than additional jacks I think.
 

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Has anybody ever installed scissor jacks (one one each side mounted to the frame behind the wheels) that are used to level (not just stabalize) in place of ramps or 2x6's. They are not that expensive and seem like a good alternative to having to carry all that stuff around to level the TT?
 

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I read that too. It makes sense to me that if you put them out at the corners, that it could put stress on the frame.

My thought was to put one just behind the wheels on each side, attached to the frame. Since the axle is attached to the frame, it doesn't seem to me that there would be all that much difference. When I pulled into the site, I would only use the one on the low side to level the TT side-to-side. Since most of the "leveling jacks" are advertised rated to around 6000lbs, it should be no problem supporting the weight. I would then use the existing "stabalizing jacks" already on the TT to stabalize.

I would appreciate the continued input from the community here.
I use the Lynx levelers and then put the stackable aluminum screw jacks in front and behind each wheel. I then also use the factory stabilizers at each corner.

While I don't use them for leveling, it makes a big difference in the stabilizing.

Steve
 

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My experience with scissors jacks. The first tt I had was a Nomad and came with no stabilizers. Being the cheapskate I am (or so I'm told) I grabbed a couple of jacks from my project Fieros to take along. They worked fine for stabilizing but were limited in height compared to actual RV scissors jacks. They are heavy though to carry around. The next Christmas, under the tree were 4 scissors jacks that my teenage kids scrounged up from the local junk yard so I didn't have to raid the projects anymore. I was touched by their resourcefulness. I guess its true that the nut doesn't fall far from the tree.
I now use Lynx type blocks and or wood blocks for the wheels and the factory stabilizers on the OB.
Bob
 

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I read that too. It makes sense to me that if you put them out at the corners, that it could put stress on the frame.

My thought was to put one just behind the wheels on each side, attached to the frame. Since the axle is attached to the frame, it doesn't seem to me that there would be all that much difference. When I pulled into the site, I would only use the one on the low side to level the TT side-to-side. Since most of the "leveling jacks" are advertised rated to around 6000lbs, it should be no problem supporting the weight. I would then use the existing "stabalizing jacks" already on the TT to stabalize.

I would appreciate the continued input from the community here.
Most manifactorers don't recommed even jacking up a tailer to change tires using the frame, they want you to use the axle to jack it up with. The frame isn't made to jack up the camper with. I have seen some aftermarket jacks that hook up to a 5th wheel like the jacks on a Class C that can be used to level the camper. I don't think they are recommended for the Outback, the frame is too light.

I heard that one of the easier and lightest thing to use to level trailers is the blue insulation board cut into about 2' long pieces. Surprisingly, driving a tailer onto it won't distroy it. About the only problem is trying to keep it from blowing away if the wind is blowing..
 

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I LIKE that blue board idea! especialy if you glue some luan to it or something of that nature. I "m seeing blue in my future. Will be lighter than the lumber thats for sure.
 

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I LIKE that blue board idea! especialy if you glue some luan to it or something of that nature. I "m seeing blue in my future. Will be lighter than the lumber thats for sure.
I like the fact this thread was brought out of the grave....2 years and 9 months since the most recent posting.
 

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I read that too. It makes sense to me that if you put them out at the corners, that it could put stress on the frame.

My thought was to put one just behind the wheels on each side, attached to the frame. Since the axle is attached to the frame, it doesn't seem to me that there would be all that much difference. When I pulled into the site, I would only use the one on the low side to level the TT side-to-side. Since most of the "leveling jacks" are advertised rated to around 6000lbs, it should be no problem supporting the weight. I would then use the existing "stabalizing jacks" already on the TT to stabalize.

I would appreciate the continued input from the community here.
I use the Lynx levelers and then put the stackable aluminum screw jacks in front and behind each wheel. I then also use the factory stabilizers at each corner.

While I don't use them for leveling, it makes a big difference in the stabilizing.

Steve
[/quote]

Ditto Same as Steve
I wouldn't want to take the chance of twisting the frame by changing the jacks on the back and leveling it that way

Don
 

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Old post or not...it's a great topic.
IMHO...
I would be leary of leveling the trailer with these jacks. To stabilize...yes. To level...no.
 

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I recently asked for (and received
) 4 BAL scissor jacks for Christmas. My plan was to use them in lieu of the factory installed stabilizers. I do not plan to level the OB with the jacks. Now, after reading this very helpful thread, I'm reconsidering my decision. If I use the new scissor jacks for stabilizing only, not leveling, am I in danger of twisting the frame? Thanks for the help!
 

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I have been reading all the different viewpoints about stabilizing/leveling jacks. I think if you read the fine print any and all manufacturers will state that their jacks are for stabilizing only,not for jacking or raising the trailer.
I have been RVing for 32 plus years and have owned 7 different trailers. We currently have a 2005 Outback Syndey edition fifth, the 28FRLS and love it. The very first thing I did after we camped in it once, was to haul off the scissors jacks, sold them to the guy next door for $75 and bought a pair of BAL outrigger style stabilizer jacks. Put them on in about an hour with the help of a friend. The dear little woman was ever so happy, far less wiggle and dance.
It is VERY easy to warp or twist your frame with either scissor or outrigger type jacks. I have on occasion put too much tension on the stabilizers to the point where the door (which is almost at the rear) was difficult to open and close.
Whether we like it or not the frames of our trailers bend. Good thing they do, because if they didn't, they would break. IF you have ever driven or walked across a suspension bridge on a very windy day, then you will know what I mean.
So I always use the Lynx levelers to get us level sideways, then after unhooking the fifth, use front landing jacks to get to a perfect horizontal attitude and then snug up rear outriggers.
As a point of interest about leveling a fifth with a slide. It took us a while to learn what to do about leveling cross wise. We would always get the trailer smack on the bubble. Then when we unhooked and put the slide out we would be down on the drivers side. This is not bad, because sometimes having a bit of a lean is good for draining tanks. But not good inside, especially when you are in your favourite membership camp for two weeks. I toured the Keystone plant this summer and tried to find out what the slide on our unit weighed and no one could tell me. I am thinking that road ready, with cupboards containing "stuff", a conservative guess would be about 800 to 1,000 lbs.
So now when we level we always leave drivers side a tidge high, then when slide is out it comes right on the bubble.
By the way we are leaving the cold and rain here in British Columbia and heading for 3 months in SoCal and Arizona.
All the best to all Outbackers in 2007.
Bernie and Heather Klashinsky, Sidney, BC
 
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