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OK, so we took the brand new 300BH out this weekend. Our goal was to use everything and figure out HOW to use everything, identify issues, etc., before we take it to the mountains in 3 weeks. On Saturday afternoon, we had a nice little storm kick up.

I have a Patio Room attached to the awning, staked down with nail-type tent stakes. The 300BH has a front slide, and the screen wall is basically beside this. I had my trucked parked sideways in front of the RV. As the storm was approaching, I asked one of the other guys I was with if I should pull it all up, and he said no. He was saying that the slide and my truck would provide enough of windbreak that I shouldn't even worry about it. Turns out we had a very tense hour with some lightning and high winds as the storm passed, but everything was OK~ didn't even have a stake pull free.

Yesterday I was talking with my father-in-law, who has a big Class A, and he freaked when I told him we left it down - he said that you should always pull the awning in (and take down the screen room) if there's a storm coming - he went on to say we should always pull the awning in (and therefore, take down the screen room) at night because you never know when a storm will blow up~ and you should even pull the awning in (and therefore, take down the screen room) every time you drive away from the RV, because you never know when there will be a storm......

I have a feeling the best advice is somewhere between these 2 examples. I'm just wondering if anyone with screen rooms has had experiences with them in storms, and had any advice to give?
 

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Depends on the weather where you are camping, we camp mostly in the northeast and leave our awning out unless there is a warning for bad weather. If you camp where sudden storms come up taking it down might not be a bad idea.

We were on the outer banks off NC last summer and the wind blew constantly and even more so during the frequent and sudden storms. When we were at the trailer I put out the awning and staked it. At night or when we left for any period of time we rolled it up. I also rolled up a couple of our neighbor's awnings for them. They went out and left their awnings up and storms kicked up, a few people lost their awnings in the campground while we were there that week.

Could be very costly if you leave everything set up and a bad gust of wind comes along during a storm.

Mike
 

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OK, so we took the brand new 300BH out this weekend. Our goal was to use everything and figure out HOW to use everything, identify issues, etc., before we take it to the mountains in 3 weeks. On Saturday afternoon, we had a nice little storm kick up.

I have a Patio Room attached to the awning, staked down with nail-type tent stakes. The 300BH has a front slide, and the screen wall is basically beside this. I had my trucked parked sideways in front of the RV. As the storm was approaching, I asked one of the other guys I was with if I should pull it all up, and he said no. He was saying that the slide and my truck would provide enough of windbreak that I shouldn't even worry about it. Turns out we had a very tense hour with some lightning and high winds as the storm passed, but everything was OK~ didn't even have a stake pull free.

Yesterday I was talking with my father-in-law, who has a big Class A, and he freaked when I told him we left it down - he said that you should always pull the awning in (and take down the screen room) if there's a storm coming - he went on to say we should always pull the awning in (and therefore, take down the screen room) at night because you never know when a storm will blow up~ and you should even pull the awning in (and therefore, take down the screen room) every time you drive away from the RV, because you never know when there will be a storm......

I have a feeling the best advice is somewhere between these 2 examples. I'm just wondering if anyone with screen rooms has had experiences with them in storms, and had any advice to give?
 

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I had a 18ft screen room on my last trailer made by "Patio Room" . I never took it down, went through lots of rain/wind storms. I not only would stake down the screen room but also would run two tie outs from the awning as well.. Worked everytime, if I had to take the screen down every night I would never have put it up !!
 

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I suspect you are a lot safer with the room installed than just having an awning out. Storms take out awnings all the time. If a gust of wind does catch the awning, it can rip it off rather easily.
I retract if I'm going to be gone and it's windy or weather is forecast. I often do the same at night. Again, It depends on where you are camping and what the weather is like.
 

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As a veteran of several storms with and without the screen room attached, my .02 is this. Be wary and informed about the weather and err to the side of caution. In mountainous regions, especially if we're in the open I will ALWAYS put the awning strap on, regardless of the weather condition.

I have already had our awning blown over the top of the camper due to complacecy on my part. Luckily (very)there was no damage.

This was caused by detaching the awning arms from the lower arm mounts and putting the awning into "Patio mode". The arms were staked to the ground but the stakes were no match for a 50 mph gust that caught the awning from beneath. I was caught off guard. The storm wasn't expected and lasted barely 15 minutes. I seldom detach the arms any more.

In my experience being in a relatively protected area with wind breaks (trees, obstructions to wind) an awning with Add-A-Room staked down properly, with the addition of an awning strap will handle most "normal" storms. Ensure one end of the awning is dipped to allow water to run off.

The awning on a 31RQS is huge as is some others and I have been to a few places (Cape Cod, MA, College Park MD, and Gilford NH (White Mountains) where the wind is NOTORIOUS for eating awnings. On one day alone at Cherry Hill Campground in Maryland 36 Campers "lost" their awnings. Some completely detached, the majoity were thrown over the top of the RV's roof. the awning arms, rollers and hardware does not play well with rubber roofs!

Units that had properly staked straps AND Screen Rooms/Add-A-Rooms seemed to fair better and in most cases showed no signs of any storm at all. Primarily I think that was because (on the units with add-a-rooms) the wind was not able to get under the awning and push it up which in turn pulls stakes out of the ground.

The key is to know your area and the weather you may experience and plan for the worst. If that means that you are overly cautious and you decide to drop or retract your awning, no one is going to fault you for that.

If you're leaving it up, make sure one side is dipped, your stakes are secure, your awning strap is tight and be vigilant. If the wind or storm intensifies or exits your comfort zone, you may need to act if it is safe for you to do so.

Riding out a couple of storms with a properly secured set up may add a certain amount of confidence and experience. That doesn't mean I think you should run for tornado alley or anything!! But what I am saying is a properly set up and secured awning and Add-A-Room will hold up to a decent storm.

Hope that helps....man that turned into a novel! Sorry!

Eric
 

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I use an Add a Room quite often. Stake it down correctly where you can. I add tie down straps to each end of the awning, never had a problem. Not saying I can t just never had. Biggest thing to remember is to angle the awning even with the add a room attatched for water runoff if a storm is approaching or if you leave for a while and are in areas where storms can come up quick like Myrtle Beach, S C

John
 

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Primarily I think that was because (on the units with add-a-rooms) the wind was not able to get under the awning and push it up which in turn pulls stakes out of the ground.

Eric
I agree 100%!

Also remember, staking down the awning will only offer protection for that first bad gust of wind, maybe. They basically buy you a little time to run out and put up the awning before the wind claims it. I spent last weekend in Hatteras, NC and there was steady 30+ mph winds. I was outside cooking on the grill and heard that gut wrenching sound of twisting metal, I looked over only to see an awning flapping over the roof of camper. His antenna was up and that was bent in half. BTW if you need some spare awning parts the Hatteas KOA dumpsters are full of them.


Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advice guys~ what I am hearing is that I need to 'Be Prepared' (Gee where have I heard that before?)

I'll get some of those awning straps, as I don't have any currently. Here in NC, we do get some sudden severe thunderstorms, so I'll need a plan~ and much of our camping will be at Myrtle Beach and the Outer Banks, so I'm somewhat accepting the idea we won't be able to use the Screened Porch there.

I do have a simple plan though for easy reaction to storms: my idea is that I'll stake the sides of the screen room with good nail-style pegs, and use the flimsy little tent stakes to hold the front. When I storm pops up, I'll unzip the corners of the room; disconnect the sides from the top of the awning; and drop the sides to the ground. Then I'll simply pull out the little stakes at the front and roll up the front of the screen room with the awning, until the storm passes. I'm thinking I should be able to do that in under 10 minutes.
 

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Buena Vista + Screened Room for VR is a good option if you want something for most weather environments. Best of all, once installed, it takes less than 15 minutes to set up and doesn't even require drilling in your RV. The coolest feature of this product is the double panes of glass. It has see-through outer panels to protect you from bad weather without blocking your vision and inner panels that are painted black on the inside for privacy.
 
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