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2011 Outback 250RS 2003 Ford F-350, V10
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Preparing to service bearings and brakes. I have a 2011 250RS.
7500# GVWR

For those that have performed this job, are there any tips, advice, etc to follow?

I need to get my axle info.., I’ll look for axle stickers and see if they are any.

USA made Timken bearings/ seals are my preference.

Thanks!
 

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Preparing to service bearings and brakes. I have a 2011 250RS.
7500# GVWR

For those that have performed this job, are there any tips, advice, etc to follow?

I need to get my axle info.., I’ll look for axle stickers and see if they are any.

USA made Timken bearings/ seals are my preference.

Thanks!
I just did mine recently…inner bearin seal is 1.719" ID, 2.565" O.D and axel nut is 1-1/2 inch. It’s not hard but it is time consuming, took me by myself about 4 hours. You can either get the correct tool to tap the bearing seal back in or use a block of wood with a paper towel covering it to tap it in even. I used Lucas red n tacky, but my understanding is the Lucas x-tra heavy duty is the best one can get. Make sure when you put the axel nut back on you torque it down to I believe 50ft lbs first then back it off so the wheel can spin. The manufacturer recommends to set the bearings in place by doing that, worst case tighten it down really good so the wheel doesn’t spin and then back it off (Obviously this is with the wheel off). A good seal puller would be advisable along with some brake clean and a roll of the blue disposable shop towels. Hardest part was getting the stupid seals out. Get a good seal puller, dont get the one that has two hooks on one end with a handle like a hammer (They suck as the seal is stuck in the rotor and you can’t get any good leverage and you’re fighting with the stupid thing, ended up returning the tool that doesn’t work and just used my hammer which still wasn’t easy ). I’d use a slide hammer or another tool I seen where it has a finger that grabs on and then you hit the other end up with a hammer to pop it out (I’ll look for it). I did this on my concrete pad so I put a bunch of cardboard down and didn’t mess It up. Ive also read debates on where to lift and it seems the manufacturer recommends on the frame and not the axel as it can damage the axel. I lifted on the frame with a bottle Jack near the wheel on the side closer to the front of the trailer with a back up Jack stand and when it got high enough for the front wheel it lifts the rear as well. Pull one wheel at a time for added safety if something fails the other wheel would catch. Best of luck!
 

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2011 Outback 250RS 2003 Ford F-350, V10
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31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks JD.

I looked underneath at rear of backing plates. All looks good and no apparent grease leaks. I don't believe the bearings/seals have ever been serviced by original owner. I am the second owner. I'm thinking of leaving well enough alone at this time.

Would adding a few pumps of grease into zirc fittings suffice?
I don't know what grease was used at factory....what should I use?

Thanks!
 

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I believe it’s a lithium based which you can use Timken bearing grease if you want or Lucas Red n Tacky. If you’re repacking you can put Lucas x-tra heavy duty if you want. My understanding is you’re not supposed to mix certain types of grease and I forget what X-tra heavy duty is but it’s not supposed to be mixed with lithium grease. The issue with using the zerk fitting to add grease is it can go past the rear grease seal and get on the brake pads which you’d have to replace your brake pads and rotors if that happens. If you do use it, raise the wheel off the ground, spin the wheel while pumping the grease in, the grease should come out from the side you’re pumping. Keep pumping till you see the new grease coming out, it uses a lot of grease this way so have a few tubes on hand and hopefully it doesn’t go past that rear seal. Oddly enough the manufacturer recommends only using the zerk fitting for an emergency, not sure when that’d be. I’m the original owner on mine and it was way past due and found the bearing on one of the wheels bent a little causing it to bind a bit and another the grease was starting to go past that rear seal. Other benefit with pulling the rotors is you can check your brakes and make sure everything looks like it’s in working order. My father in law did his and had to replace one of his brakes as the wires were all messed up. It’s not hard to do, just time consuming. If you do pull the rear seal and repack, I’d get a repacking tool as they don’t cost much and speeds up the time it takes unless you like doing it by hand.
 

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2011 Outback 250RS 2003 Ford F-350, V10
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks again JD.

I like things done right the first time. I enjoy all sorts of mechanical work and accessories mods, on both my boat and trailer....but bearing service on trailers is not one of them!

I may go ahead and pull wheels and do it correctly. Adding grease via zirc fittings is my attempt at being lazy and trying to avoid this, not too much fun, project.

I'll go ahead with all Timken USA parts....bearings, seals, grease. Is the Lucas Xtra Heavy Duty much better than Timken, and if so, why?

Thanks!
 

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Dont get me wrong, Timken is a good grease from what I’ve read…I haven’t personally used it so I have no personal experience with it. The Xtra heavy duty was designed more for commercial applications and heavy machinery from my understanding. It’s most likely overkill but I was raised doing things overkill lol. You’re right though it’s not a fun project (I was fighting the stupid seal each time trying to get it out 😫) but you’ll feel better when your towing it down the road. I heard it’s about $150 a wheel to pay someone to repack them, that was my motivation for doing it myself. 😆
 
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